Verschlagwortet: Turkey

Navigating Bureaucratic Hurdles: Tuberculosis and Healthcare Access in Republican Istanbul

By Zehra Betül Atasoy. Tuberculosis, often referred to as consumption or phthisis, was one of the most dreaded diseases of the 19th and 20th centuries on a global scale. From the 1930s to the 1960s, the period on which this piece focuses, tuberculosis claimed a significant number of lives each year in Turkey. The absence of a structured and centralized TB treatment and prevention system left countless individuals grappling with the disease alone. However, one of the reasons for the lack of access to treatment was the cumbersome bureaucratic processes, exacerbating social class disparities.

The COVID-19 Crisis, New Communities, New Narratives: A Snapshot  from Turkey

By Özlem Şendeniz and Elif E. Akşit. Could the COVID-19 crisis, which we currently perceive as something that belongs to the past, be an opportunity to go beyond anthropocentric thinking? Can narratives about new forms of community that complement our physical existence be constructed with animals and even with the AI via social media? This blog piece is the story of some points extracted from the online survey we conducted with a Turkish-speaking sample at the very beginning of the crisis, and the narratives that emerged around the exploratory survey.

Medicalization, Sensationalization and Self-Expression: Narratives of Intersex and Gender-Affirming Surgeries

By Ezgi Saritaş. In this essay, through the reading of popular medical writing on intersexuality alongside newspapers of the time, literary allusions and transgender self-expression, the author maps how the emerging medical discourse on normative gender and sexuality was reflected and negotiated in various narratives on sex reassignment and gender-affirming surgeries.

When Off-the-Record Takes Over: Research Ethics under Authoritarianism

By Çiçek İlengiz. In recent years, restitution demands for several artifacts raised by the Turkish government have fueled heated debates on “what belongs to whom and under which conditions,” and have simultaneously opened a new ground to reinscribe civilizational narratives onto the politics of heritage. Centered on questions around the construction of legal ownership, as well as “imaginations of inheriteance”, the author’s project aspires to connect the notions of heritage and inheritance by illustrating the links between what is considered public and private. In other words, it is an attempt to understand how what is supposedly belonging to everyone (world heritage) is legally, discursively and materially treated as inheritance.

The Science around Alcoholism or How to Banish Alcohol from the Turkish Society

By Elife Biçer-Deveci. Historical analysis of scientific debates on alcohol provides insights into power relations, political tensions, and hidden aspects of the nation-building process. In the case of early twentieth-century Turkey, scientists shaped the narrative of drinking as an alien element of the Turkish nation.

The Self-in-Crisis in the Contemporary Turkish Novel: A Case for the Relevance of Medical Humanities

By Burcu Alkan. This article examines the self-in-crisis in the Turkish novel, more specifically the origins and functions of “the psychiatric turn” in representations of madness in contemporary Turkish novels. It examines how the novelists engage with psychiatric medicine and discusses why such an engagement has become prominent in exploring existential crises in the novelistic imagination in recent years.

Envisioning a Homoeroticized Cityscape Through Work

By Ezgi Sarıtaş. In this essay, the author explores how the illustrations in the Istanbul Ansiklopedisi (encyclopedia) bring together scattered pieces of a visual archive of the urban poor and their marginal labour, while concurrently adopting a voyeuristic interpretation of physical labour and young male bodies as objects of homoerotic desire.

“The question is rather if it is possible for disciplines as institutions to carve out a place that is truly anti-authoritarian” – 5in10 with Önder Çelik

Önder Çelik is a EUME Fellow, whose research explores the material and temporal dimensions constituted by the practices of dispossessed young Kurdish men searching for valuable objects believed to be buried by the victims of the Armenian genocide.

Picturing the Labor Landscape: The Silahtarağa Power Plant and Istanbul’s Electrical Infrastructure

By Nurçin İleri. This essay centres on a series of photographs, which I first came across at an auction in November 2020. These black and white images depict Istanbul’s first urban scale power plant, the Silahtarağa campus and extension of the grid to the city in the early 1910s.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search