Verschlagwortet: Russia

Politics of Distorted Numbers: How Russia is Counting Displaced Ukrainians and Why?

By Lidia Kuzemska. The scales of displacement and return have symbolical meanings for state actors, either of political failure (massive outflow of population) or political success (high number of returns). In the case of forced displacement of Ukrainians to Russia, the inflated and unverified number of border crossings between Ukraine and Russia, moreover, provided only by the Russian side, mistakenly transformed into a number of supposedly real individual Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasion in the direction of the aggressor state.

The Russian “Civilizing Mission” and the Russian War against Ukraine: the 19th-Century Colonial Origins

By Elżbieta Kwiecińska. This article examines the colonial concept of the civilizing mission as a cultural transfer in East-Central Europe during the nineteenth century. The author outlines the nineteenth century colonial origins of the contemporary Russian justification of the war against Ukraine as a Russian “civilizing mission”.

Privacy and Personal Data Protection in Russia, Lithuania and Germany: Law, Legacy and Cyber Shift

In this article, Monika Rogers investigates if the historical ideas and beliefs about privacy and personal data protection are still shaping the experiences, law, perceptions and behaviours in the digital world of Lithuania, Russia and (East) Germany, three countries united by similar historical experiences of living in non-democratic sociesties with state-socialist legal systems.

The End of Unity: How the Russian Orthodox Church Lost Ukraine

By Regina Elsner. Since the end of the Soviet Union, dozens of theologians and scholars of religion elaborated on the complicated relationships within the church community of the so-called Holy Rus’. The Moscow Patriarchate defines its territory of spiritual responsibility as encompassing the former Soviet Union – except for the old churches of Armenia and Georgia.

We Didn’t Start the Fire: Military Interventions from Kosovo to Kiev

By Katarina Ristić. Only a few days before the attack on Ukraine, Russian president Vladimir Putin responded to those scandalized by the prospect of a war in Europe, reminding Europeans that such a war had already taken place. In 1999, he said, it was the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) – not Russia – that had started a “large-scale military operation that included air strikes against a European capital, Belgrade”.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search