Verschlagwortet: public discourse

The Use of Humor During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Taiwan

By Chunping Lin. The word “幽默 yōumò,” which means “humor” in Chinese, is originally from Jiǔzhāng 九章 of the Chu Lyrics 楚辭 Chǔcí (475 B.C.–221 B.C.) and was used to describe the tranquility of nature. Lin Yutang林語堂 (linguist, philosopher, and translator, 1895–1976) translated the English word “humor” with the word “幽默 yōumò”.

Gods and Outcasts: Ambivalent Attitudes towards Health Workers in India during the Coronavirus Pandemic

By Gautam Liu. The COVID-19 pandemic in India generated a strange phenomenon in how health workers were perceived. On the one hand officials were not tired in proclaiming doctors and nurses as gods, on the other hand health workers were ostracized by large parts of the general population.

Challenges in Literary Studies and Gender Studies or Why I Began to Talk Publicly about Relevance

Andrea Geier (Modern German Literature/Gender Studies, University of Trier, Germany). As a literary scholar specializing in gender studies, intercultural studies, and postcolonial studies at a German university, I experience positive challenges in my everyday research and teaching.

تحديات في الدراسات الأدبية ودراسات الجندر أو لماذا رحتُ أتحدّثُ على الملأ عن الصِّلة

أندريا غاير )الأدب الألماني الحديث/ دراسات الجندر، جامعة ترير، ألمانيا). بصفتي باحثة أدبية متخصصة في دراسات الجندر ودراسات التفاعل بين الثقافات ودراسات ما بعد الاستعمار في جامعة ألمانية، فإنني أواجه تحديات إيجابية في بحثي وتدريسي اليوميين.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search