Tagged: nationalism

Nationalism on the Shop Floor: The Silahtarağa Electric Power Plant in the Early 1920s

By Nurçin İleri. In January 1936, İzzettin Muhittin Apak, a journalist from Akşam Postası (Evening Post) decided to visit the Silahtarağa Electrical Power Plant, the main electric power supplier of Istanbul, a city with a population of 900,000. What most attracted Apak’s attention was the hospital-like cleanliness of the power plant, and that almost everything was being automated in this vast industrial place.

Imagining Southern Spaces: Hemispheric and Transatlantic Souths in Antebellum US Writings

By Deniz Bozkurt-Pekár. Let me set the scene: A rich meadow expanding by the bountiful river, a gentleman leaning on the white column of the porch of a haint-blue mansion, a pale-white lady in flamboyant attire sitting on a rocking-chair behind him, away from them yet within their eyesight are the cotton, corn, or tobacco fields hiding behind their crop the tired bodies of black men, women, and children.

The League Against Imperialism: Lives and Afterlives

Interview with Sana Tannoury-Karam. Founded in Brussels in 1927, the League Against Imperialism attracted anticolonial activists like Nehru, Sukarno, and Kenyatta, as well as figures like Einstein and Madame Sun Yat-Sen. Its immediate goals were to develop solidarity between communists, socialists, and anti-colonial nationalists worldwide.

On Dersim and the Banality of Evil: The Diary of Yusuf Kenan Akım

By Zeynep Türkyilmaz. Entering my usual keywords randomly to see what is out there in my areas of interest, I came across a diary of a Turkish soldier kept during the year 1938. Ego-documents are a rare source in Ottoman-Turkish studies, but the content of this particular diary made it unique and almost unreal beyond my wildest expectations.

Exiled Among Nations: German and Mennonite Mythologies in a Transnational Age – Interview with John P.R. Eicher

Earlier this year, the monograph “Exiled Among Nations: German and Mennonite Mythologies in a Transnational Age” by John P.R. Eicher was published by Cambridge University Press, in the Publications of the German Historical Institute Series. We talked with the author about the origins of his book, the role of institutions for diasporic groups and links between his research and today’s world.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search