Tagged: migration

The Strange Case of Portugal’s Returnees

By Christoph Kalter. The year is 1975, and the footage comes from the Portuguese Red Cross. Who, or maybe what, are these people? Returnees or retornados is the term commonly assigned to more than half-a-million people, the vast majority of them white settlers from Angola and Mozambique, most of whom arrived in Lisbon in 1975.

Refugees and Religion

By Birgit Meyer. The volume Refugees and Religion: Ethnographic Studies of Global Trajectories, co-edited by Birgit Meyer and Peter van der Veer, disputes a hard and fast distinction between migrants and refugees by showing how shifting legal arrangements as well as people’s varying statuses make the concept of ‘refugee’ dynamic.

The Museum for Islamic Art in Berlin and Its Quest for Socio-Political Relevance: The Example of the TAMAM Project

By Roman Singendonk (Curator, Museum for Islamic Art, Berlin, Germany). The role that museums play in society has been constantly changing over the past decades, and now, more than ever, they are expected to serve society’s prosperity.

متحف الفنّ الإسلامي في برلين وسعيه وراء صلة اجتماعية سياسية: مشروع “تمام” نموذجًا

رومان زِنغِندونك (قَيِّم، متحف الفنّ الإسلامي، برلين، ألمانيا). كان الدور الذي تؤدّيه المتاحف في المجتمع قيد تغيّر متواصل طوال العقود الماضية. ومن المتوقع الآن، أكثر من أيّ وقت مضى، أن تساهم المتاحف في ازدهار المجتمع.

Mozambique’s Borders

By Adérito Júlio Machava. During the period prior to the setting up of the Portuguese colonial administration in southeast Africa, there were important waves of forced migrations caused by, firstly, the Mfecane, and secondly the defeat of King Ngungunhane in 1895, and the subsequent overthrow of the Gaza Empire.

Congo’s White ‘Refugees’

By Lazlo Passemiers. Not all people seeking refuge in Africa have been black. One group of white refuge-seekers in Africa consisted of whites who fled from their African countries of residence after the fall of colonial and white minority rule.

From the Niger to the Nile

By Madina Thiam. On February 17, 1907, a brief note went out of the Dakar office of the Governor-General of French West Africa, addressed to subordinates. The governor had learned through French newspapers that: “According to a report on Northern Nigeria … thousands of Fulanis from the Middle Niger might be migrating from the French territory and heading towards the Nile valley.”

Nationalism on the Shop Floor: The Silahtarağa Electric Power Plant in the Early 1920s

By Nurçin İleri. In January 1936, İzzettin Muhittin Apak, a journalist from Akşam Postası (Evening Post) decided to visit the Silahtarağa Electrical Power Plant, the main electric power supplier of Istanbul, a city with a population of 900,000. What most attracted Apak’s attention was the hospital-like cleanliness of the power plant, and that almost everything was being automated in this vast industrial place.

Passing as a Refugee

By Keren Weitzberg. Mahad was born in Kenya – a fact that neither his passport, nor carefully scripted biography suggests. For decades, Kenyan Somalis (citizens of Kenya who also identify as Somali) have faced discrimination in accessing legal documents, including national identity cards, passports, and birth certificates.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search