Verschlagwortet: Germany

When Off-the-Record Takes Over: Research Ethics under Authoritarianism

By Çiçek İlengiz. In recent years, restitution demands for several artifacts raised by the Turkish government have fueled heated debates on “what belongs to whom and under which conditions,” and have simultaneously opened a new ground to reinscribe civilizational narratives onto the politics of heritage. Centered on questions around the construction of legal ownership, as well as “imaginations of inheriteance”, the author’s project aspires to connect the notions of heritage and inheritance by illustrating the links between what is considered public and private. In other words, it is an attempt to understand how what is supposedly belonging to everyone (world heritage) is legally, discursively and materially treated as inheritance.

Ukrainian Forcefully Displaced Persons in Germany: To Stay or to Leave?

By Natalia Zaitseva-Chipak. In the near future, Ukrainian forcefully displaced persons could adapt and be able to join the German economy, which can become potentially powerful factors of its growth. Given that most of the migrants are women (of working age) with children, these contributions will refer to not only the near but also the more distant future.
At the same time, the loss of these people will be detrimental to postwar Ukraine. Even today, Ukrainian demographers fear the country’s depopulation. This, in turn, could be a critical factor in slowing down the country’s reconstruction, as it requires labor, skilled workers, and young people.

Rethinking East European Studies in Times of Upheaval: Some Reflections on Ukrainian Studies in Germany (and Not Only)

By Andrii Portnov. Ukrainian history and literature in the German higher education system are the disciplines whose institutional weakness is more than obvious. Ukraine itself, in the eyes of a large part of German (including academic) society, still does not have enough cultural and historical agency and remains ‘in the shadow of Russia’.

Racism in German Public Institutions – Interview with Matthias Middell

The Research Institute for Social Cohesion is investigating racism in German public institutions on behalf of the Federal Ministry of the Interior in a project titled “Rassismus als Gefährdung des gesellschaftlichen Zusammenhalts im Kontext ausgewählter gesellschaftlich-institutioneller Bereiche”. We discussed the goals of this research with Matthias Middell (University of Leipzig), spokesperson of the FGZ and co-principal investigator of this study.

Humanities in Germany: Sciences Among Sciences

By Sabine Behrenbeck (Head of Department for Higher Education, German Council for Science and Humanities, Germany). There are many common problems and complaints regarding the humanities in anglophone nations and Germany, but there is also one important difference: In Germany the disciplines dealing with culture and language, religion and history are “sciences among sciences” (Wissenschaften unter Wissenschaften).

الإنسانيات في ألمانيا: علومٌ بين العلوم

زابينه بيرنبيك (رئيسة قسم التعليم العالي، المجلس الألماني للعلوم والإنسانيات، ألمانيا). ثمّة كثير من المشكلات والشكاوى المشتركة المتعلّقة بالإنسانيات في البلدان الناطقة بالإنكليزية وفي ألمانيا، لكنّ هنالك أيضًا فارقًا مهمًّا: في ألمانيا، الفروع التخصّصية التي تُعنى بالثقافة واللغة والدين والتاريخ هي “علومٌ بين العلوم” (Wissenschaften unter Wissenschaften). وما من تمييز بين ما يُسمّى “Geisteswissenschaften” (العلوم الإنسانية) ومباحث أخرى من خلال تسميات خاصّة (مثل الإنسانيات أو الآداب الحرّة)، ولذلك يُنظَر إليها وتُعامَل على قدم المساواة لناحية اختيار الطلّاب أو المسارات الوظيفية أو تمويل الأبحاث.

Refugees and Religion

By Birgit Meyer. The volume Refugees and Religion: Ethnographic Studies of Global Trajectories, co-edited by Birgit Meyer and Peter van der Veer, disputes a hard and fast distinction between migrants and refugees by showing how shifting legal arrangements as well as people’s varying statuses make the concept of ‘refugee’ dynamic.

The National Frame: Art and State Violence in Turkey and Germany

By Banu Karaca. The National Frame emerged out of my long-term interest in art, aesthetics and politics. I have always been fascinated by the dominant notion that art is inherently good, by the many values that are accorded to art – be it that art furthers individual agency and critical faculties, the emancipatory potential of art, or its civilizing impact – and the realities that shape the daily workings of the art world.

Why Non-European Languages Matter to European Humanities: Area Studies and Postcolonial Philology

By Christian Junge (Arabic Studies, University of Marburg, Germany). English is, without doubt, the dominant academic language of our time, especially in the natural sciences, where materials are often taught and published in English. On the contrary, in European humanities, scholars of literary and cultural studies, linguistics and philosophy teach and publish quite widely in minor academic languages, such as German, Italian or Polish.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search