Verschlagwortet: Eastern Europe

“Developing Ukrainian Studies” – Reflections and Impressions

In this report, Elen Budinova shares some reflections and impressions regarding the conference “Developing Ukrainian Studies: Ukraine in Research and Teaching in the Subjects Slavic Literary and Cultural Studies, Slavic Linguistics in Dialogue with East European History”, which took place in the Dornburg Old Palace from October 12 to 13, 2023. The conference was organized by the research network project “European Times” (EUTIM), the Aleksander Brückner Center for Polish Studies, and the Network for Ukrainian Studies.

The Anticolonial Solidarity Campaign of 1962 in the Hungarian Countryside: An Attempt to Make Global Connections

By Réka Krizmanics. This article discusses a case study of an anticolonial solidarity campaign in the Hungarian countryside based on the archival records of the Hungarian Women’s National Council (HWNC), focusing on spaces and protagonists that are rarely centered in similar investigations. By expanding on this example, it seeks to demonstrate some of the difficulties that arose for women in their practical work that underpinned an important anticolonial initiative.

Avtoportreti Zghvarze: A Film Essay on Memory, Hope and the Search for One’s Identity

Anna Dziapshipa’s essay film “Self-Portrait Along the Borderline” (2023) was screened as part of the Georgian Film Series at the Ukrainian Film Festival (UFF) in Berlin. In the film, Dziapshipa uses her family archive to reconstruct an intimate portrait of her Georgian-Abkhazian family and to reflect on broader issues of identity and memory in the context of war. A review by Ekaterina Grineva.

Retrospective as a New Perspective: An Insight into the 4th Ukrainian Film Festival Berlin

With this year’s motto No Time Like Home (Дім в часі in Ukrainian), the fourth edition of the Ukrainian Film Festival Berlin took place from the 25th to 29th October. Having screened a total of 19 short films, ten recent full-length films and three additional films in the Retrospective programme, as well as three recent Georgian films, across five different cinemas, the festival proved to be a growing success in Berlin’s cultural landscape. A review by Oleksii Isakov.

Politics of Distorted Numbers: How Russia is Counting Displaced Ukrainians and Why?

By Lidia Kuzemska. The scales of displacement and return have symbolical meanings for state actors, either of political failure (massive outflow of population) or political success (high number of returns). In the case of forced displacement of Ukrainians to Russia, the inflated and unverified number of border crossings between Ukraine and Russia, moreover, provided only by the Russian side, mistakenly transformed into a number of supposedly real individual Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasion in the direction of the aggressor state.

“It was precisely the total absence of reports on the situation on the ground that attracted my attention” – 5in10 with Aleksandra Ancite-Jepifánova

Aleksandra Ancite-Jepifánova is a researcher in European and comparative migration and asylum law. Her academic interests currently concentrate on two broad areas: family migration and access to international protection. She is currently a visiting researcher at the Amsterdam Centre for Migration and Refugee Law. Her research project aims to provide a comparative analysis of Latvian, Lithuanian and Polish responses to the situation at the EU’s border with Belarus, focusing on access to the asylum procedure and compliance with the Rule of Law.

History Teacher of the People: Volodymyr Zelensky, Vasyl Holoborodko and his displaced colleagues

Viktoria Sereda illustrates why Volodomyr Zelensky won the 2019-election, how he shifted the narrative in Ukraine and what role the fictional character of a history teacher played in all of it. By bridging the gap bewteen fiction and reality, she then exposes the experiences and feelings of two real history teachers, forced to leave their homes in the Donbas and Crimea.

Rethinking East European Studies in Times of Upheaval: Some Reflections on Ukrainian Studies in Germany (and Not Only)

By Andrii Portnov. Ukrainian history and literature in the German higher education system are the disciplines whose institutional weakness is more than obvious. Ukraine itself, in the eyes of a large part of German (including academic) society, still does not have enough cultural and historical agency and remains ‘in the shadow of Russia’.

Literary (Re)Visions of Time in Eastern and Central Europe – Papers II

This blogpost is the second part of a summary of the contributions to the EUTIM conference “Time Out of Joint: Literary (Re)Visions of Time in Eastern and Central Europe”. At the centre of the event were were narratives of time and conceptualizations of history in Central and Eastern European poetry, novels, film, and drama.

Literary (Re)Visions of Time in Eastern and Central Europe – Papers I

At the centre of the EUTIM conference “Time Out of Joint: Literary (Re)Visions of Time in Eastern and Central Europe”, were narratives of time and conceptualizations of history in Central and Eastern European poetry, novels, film, and drama. The event featured some of the leading scholars of Belarusian, Crimean Tatar, Czech, Polish and Ukrainian literatures. This contribution is the first part of a dossier with the paper abstracts.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search