Kategorie: Series

Series are sequences of essays on common questions, that are addressed from personal standpoints and particular positions, written in an accessible way that contextualizes and opens up the consideration beyond the boundaries of disciplines and areas of expertise. Series are curated by individual scholars or editorial groups. They are reviewed or peer-reviewed by the editors and/or participants of the series. They can be employed in writing workshops or accompany the work of collective projects. For more information on form see Contributions.

The Use of Humor During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Taiwan

By Chunping Lin. The word “幽默 yōumò,” which means “humor” in Chinese, is originally from Jiǔzhāng 九章 of the Chu Lyrics 楚辭 Chǔcí (475 B.C.–221 B.C.) and was used to describe the tranquility of nature. Lin Yutang林語堂 (linguist, philosopher, and translator, 1895–1976) translated the English word “humor” with the word “幽默 yōumò”.

Towards a Truly Global Digital Humanities

By Diana Roig-Sanz. The idea that the digital humanities enjoy a global scope remains utopian. Most of the departments and research institutions that house postgraduate studies, summer schools, international conferences, and scientific journals on the matter remain anchored in the Global North, especially in certain countries such as the United Kingdom, the United States and Canada.

Unicorns in the Real World: Triple Discrimination within a Neoliberal Education System

By Jennifer Wilkinson. The current neoliberal system has become a parasitic affront to the core aims of education. Woven into the fabric of education, Neoliberalism has risen to a state of liberal legality. With arbitrary and discriminatory standards of success, this legality obscures the fundamental right to learn.

Whose History is it? The Challenges and Paradoxes of Studying Queer History in a Neoliberal and Nationalist Context

By Mathias Foit. Ever since the Law and Justice (PiS) party’s victory in the 2015 parliamentary election, queer research in Poland has become especially challenging and more politicised than ever before. The moment the ultraconservative PiS party won the election in 2015 and secured an outright majority can be pinpointed as the beginning of what some have referred to as a “conservative revolution” in Poland.

The World Historical Gazetteer: A Digital Humanities Interface for Transregional Research

By Susan Grunewald, Ruth Mostern, and Karl Grossner. As digital projects become increasingly popular for the humanities, linked open data (LOD) is a means to combine the efforts of many individual researchers and research teams to enable truly transregional research.

Cripping the Neoliberal University – We need a Politics of Care

By Anya Heise-von der Lippe. In the summer and fall of 2021, academics across the German university system took to social media in unprecedented numbers to expose the precariousness of their employment situations and the struggles of working within a system that relies on a great amount of personal commitment and flexibility.

Reporting Corona

By Marina Rudyak. The seminar “Reporting Corona: State Media, Critical Journalism and Citizen Witnessing during the COVID-19 Outbreak in Wuhan” at the Institute of Chinese Studies at Heidelberg University, which I taught in the summer semester of 2021, explored the news and information production in locked-down Wuhan. It analysed the different types of reporting and writing, their motivations and their ways of coping with censorship.

Dealing with Sexual Harassment and Violence in the Neoliberal University

By Tanja Wälty. The issue of sexual harassment and violence (SHV) has received more attention in recent years thanks to feminist interventions such as #Aufschrei, #MeToo, and #NiUnaMenos. At the same time, neoliberal governmentality has led to an “economization of the social” (Ludwig 2010), in which the market becomes the structuring principle for social relations.

Reconciling Care Work with an Academic Career at the Neoliberal University

By Alena Sander. Coming towards the end of my doctoral journey, my initial optimism about an academic career quickly faded as I began to look into the world of post-docs and further academic career options and realized: it is going to be harder than I thought. One of the main reasons for this is that I identify and am read as a mother*.

Gods and Outcasts: Ambivalent Attitudes towards Health Workers in India during the Coronavirus Pandemic

By Gautam Liu. The COVID-19 pandemic in India generated a strange phenomenon in how health workers were perceived. On the one hand officials were not tired in proclaiming doctors and nurses as gods, on the other hand health workers were ostracized by large parts of the general population.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search