Kategorie: Other Series

Other Series are sequences of essays on common questions that have been addressed from personal standpoints and particular positions in the past. Written in an accessible way, they contextualize and open up the consideration beyond the boundaries of disciplines and areas of expertise.

Hysteria: Unveiling Tunisian Women’s Journey in Writing Chick-Lit

In this article, Cyrine Kortas reviews the Tunisian writer Faten Fazaa’s book “Hysteria”. Written in Tunisian dialect and focusing on the everyday struggles of an ordinary woman from the old Medina, the book is labeled as Tunisian chick lit, a new literary genre that has flourished. Offering a glimpse into the lives of Tunisian young women, she addresses social and political issues while questioning cultural norms. By means of this novel Cyrine Kortas examines the topic of female gender identity negotiation in a Muslim society on the eve of the Arab Spring era.

Digital Monolingualism, Archives at Risk, and Global Views on Open Access

By Kathleen Schlütter and Eva Ommert (Research Centre Global Dynamics, Leipzig University). Report on the Roundtable “The Future of the Archive(s): Digital Infrastructures Across Regions”  

(17.11.2023 at the University of Regensburg (Department for Interdisciplinary and Multiscalar Area Studies) & Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS) and online, NFDI4Memory in cooperation with CrossArea e.V.)

Resilience and Connection. A field report on the international congress “Rethinking Ukraine and Europe: New Challenges for Historians”

By Denys Shatalov. In September, 2023, the international congress titled “Rethinking Ukraine and Europe: New Challenges for Historians” took place in Vilnius. This event was organized by the Lithuanian Institute of History, in collaboration with partner organizations from Germany, Ukraine, Poland, and Ukraine. Among these partners was Prisma Ukraïna. Vilnius University hosted the congress. A report.

“Photographers are very eloquent speakers” – A Conversation with Jessica Zychowicz and Mariia Kravchenko on the exhibition Ukraine: War and Resistance

This year, the exhibition “Ukraine: War and Resistance”, featuring a collection of 40 images by Fulbright Alumni from Ukraine, or American Fulbrighters who have lived and worked for several years or longer in Ukraine, had its premiere in Germany at Hotel Continental – Art Space in Berlin. For this occasion, Sophie Schmäing interviewed Mariia Kravchenko, Program Officer and Jessica Zychowicz, Director at Fulbright Program in Ukraine & Institute of International Education Kyiv Office, about how resistance was literally enacted when the exhibition was first launched in the city of Vinnytsia and how intensive exchanges on the curation of the photos contributed to forming local and intellectual communities.

Gender Studies in Afghanistan or jender bazi: The Neoliberal University, Knowledge Production and Labour Under Military Occupation

By Paniz Musawi Natanzi. Following the military invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, private universities in Kabul became sites of marketisation and models for other cities in the country. In the process of neoliberal transformation, gender mainstreaming was a key cross-sectoral tool, intersecting foreign development and military policies, which included higher education. Funding for the development of university degree programmes and scholarships in gender studies came with conditions of adhering to an anti-social political and epistemological understanding of gender that builds on expanding “individualisation and financialisation”, while claiming to serve communities through entrepreneurialism. The hegemony of finance under neoliberal imperialism, the current manifestation of capitalism and process of empire-building, in sites of military and humanitarian-developmental intervention, reconfigured social, political, economic and epistemological structures also through the university. A critical analysis.

The ‘Emergency Grab Bag’ of Memory, or the Tonalities of News Headlines About the War in Ukraine – Part Twо

By Olha Haidamachuk. The war forces you to hastily gather your whole life into a small emergency grab bag and urgently leave your home. Only your memories stay fully with you. The headlines in media outlets and their vocabulary set the tone for the perception by the reader and certain kinds of “emergency grab bags” of memories about a war.

Unearthing the Substrata of Images – Interview with Sanaz Sohrabi

In this piece, Nurçin Ileri interviewed Sanaz Sohrabi, a doctoral candidate at the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Society and Culture, Montréal. Her doctoral project looks at how visual representations of oil have changed postcolonial sovereignty and resource nationalism in Iran over time. She is also an artist and filmmaker. In relation to her project, she prepares a trilogy of essay films

Moving Through Space, Sheltering Across Time: Alternate Realities in Contemporary Arabic Fiction of (Forced) Displacement

Annamaria Bianco’s contribution aims to show how Arab migration writings and future writings have increasingly ended up overlapping, in the wake of the “speculative turn” taken by contemporary fiction. Through a review of a few novels published after the so-called “refugee crisis” in 2015 and drawing on different studies as well as on the notion of “refugeedom”, the author will show how this literary genre juxtaposes the documentary function of prose with narrative strategies of estrangement and defamiliarization that aim to generate in the reader a desire to act on the present, to redeem the past and change the future of hospitality worldwide.

Layering in GIS as a Method of Historical Deconstruction and Source Criticism

By Julius Wilm. Quantitative approaches have fallen out of fashion in the discipline of history. If one goes back a few decades, this is a surprise. In the 1960s to 1990s, quantification was hailed as a key to the renewal of the discipline, which would finally satisfy scholarly criteria in representing historical reality on a large scale instead of relying on anecdotes.

Reclaiming Spaces from the Streets to the Gutter: Sketching Feminisms in Contemporary Arab Graphic Narratives

By Rasha Chatta. In a region where authoritarian and patriarchal regimes have held the monopoly on what circulates publicly and where spaces of contestation are under scrutiny, graphic narratives or qisas musawwara as they are referred to in the Arabic language—alongside other popular arts such as graffiti or street art—have carved out a new arena of dissent that was made possible by the hopes for social and political changes instigated in the wave of the so-called Arab Spring.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search