Kategorie: EUME

Europe in the Middle East – The Middle East in Europe (EUME) is a multi-disciplinary research program at the Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien. The guiding idea of EUME is to explore the historical, political, religious, social and cultural interconnections and demarcations that link and divide Europe and the Middle East. In contrast to thinking in terms of opposites and dichotomies, the diverse processes of reception and translation, common historical legacies, and the mobility of persons, ideas, and societies are to be brought into focus.

Editors: Georges Khalil, Claudia Pfitzner und Rashof Salih

The Ottoman Canon and the Construction of Arabic and Turkish Literatures: Personal and Scholarly Reflections on My Book

C. Ceyhun Arslan introduces his recently published book “The Ottoman Canon and the Construction of Arabic and Turkish Literatures” which challenges assumptions about the modernization of Arabic and Turkish literatures, examining their evolution into national literatures comparable to Western ones. The book explores how Ottoman authors navigated multilingual influences, shaping literary traditions and national identities in the Middle East and North Africa. It highlights how late Ottoman and post-Ottoman scholars integrated and reinterpreted classical texts, revealing the complex cultural and literary dynamics that formed modern Arabic and Turkish literary canons.

Navigating Bureaucratic Hurdles: Tuberculosis and Healthcare Access in Republican Istanbul

By Zehra Betül Atasoy. Tuberculosis, often referred to as consumption or phthisis, was one of the most dreaded diseases of the 19th and 20th centuries on a global scale. From the 1930s to the 1960s, the period on which this piece focuses, tuberculosis claimed a significant number of lives each year in Turkey. The absence of a structured and centralized TB treatment and prevention system left countless individuals grappling with the disease alone. However, one of the reasons for the lack of access to treatment was the cumbersome bureaucratic processes, exacerbating social class disparities.

Gaza through a Mother’s Lens

By Zahyie Kundos. Since Gaza was set on fire, once again, I am asking myself: When will I manage to bring myself to language, to carry the duty of recording the apocalyptic scenes of death, and to imagine a way for rebirth thereof? The least of interventions from my safe place in the diaspora: bringing self to letters. Imagine. But I haven’t been able to, and I am troubled to understand why not. Why is the distance between myself and the act of translating feelings into letters so big this time?

The COVID-19 Crisis, New Communities, New Narratives: A Snapshot  from Turkey

By Özlem Şendeniz and Elif E. Akşit. Could the COVID-19 crisis, which we currently perceive as something that belongs to the past, be an opportunity to go beyond anthropocentric thinking? Can narratives about new forms of community that complement our physical existence be constructed with animals and even with the AI via social media? This blog piece is the story of some points extracted from the online survey we conducted with a Turkish-speaking sample at the very beginning of the crisis, and the narratives that emerged around the exploratory survey.

“As I Worked More in Academia, I Have Come to Realize that Each Methodology Has a Cost.” – 5in10 with C. Ceyhun Arslan

C. Ceyhun Arslan is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Koç University and Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at the Forum Transregionale Studien and Saarland University. His first book, The Ottoman Canon and the Construction of Arabic and Turkish Literatures, has just been published by Edinburgh University Press. He is working on his second book project entitled Becoming Mediterranean: Views from Arabic, French, and Ottoman Literatures.

Domicide: Architecture, War, and the Destruction of Home in Syria

In this article, Ammar Azzouz introduces his recently published book “Domicide: Architecture, War and the Destruction of Home in Syria”. The deliberate destruction of peoples’ material, built and social environments have become to be known as domicide. Domicide is the deliberate killing of home. Focussing on the Syrian city of Homs, the author brings the mass destruction of cities during wars closer to the suffering of the people.

Medicalization, Sensationalization and Self-Expression: Narratives of Intersex and Gender-Affirming Surgeries

By Ezgi Saritaş. In this essay, through the reading of popular medical writing on intersexuality alongside newspapers of the time, literary allusions and transgender self-expression, the author maps how the emerging medical discourse on normative gender and sexuality was reflected and negotiated in various narratives on sex reassignment and gender-affirming surgeries.

The No-State Solution

In this article, the Palistinian sociologist Mohammed A. Bamyeh, outlines a “No-State Solution” to the area between the Jordan river and the Mediterranean Sea. This “No-State Solution” was discussed at an event on January 28, 2024, hosted by a number of local institutions in Victoria, Canada by the author and Israeli political scientist Uri Gordon. The idea of no-state was understood to foreground the virtues of free association, multiple loyalties, and uncoerced order — all as counterweights to centralized control, militarized states, fanatic loyalties, and permanent mobilization of populations.

Dounia and the Princess of Aleppo: A Syrian Tale of War and Exile

By Elise Daniaud Oudeh and Loaay Wattad.
“Dounia and the Princess of Aleppo” is an animated film produced by artists Marya Zarif and André Kadi. As the sequel of the film, “Dounia and the Great White North”, will soon be playing at festivals, this article explores the original creative process of Marya Zarif. The movie introduces us to the life of Dounia, a young Syrian child born and raised in Aleppo. From her birth in an old traditional house, to her departure, hands in hands with her grandparents, as civil unrest and repression start spreading in the country, the viewer follows the daily life of the small family.

“The Deafening Silence from Academic Institutions (…) Serves as a Disheartening Deterrent” – 5in10 with Loaay Wattad

Loaay Wattad is a Lecturer at the Department of Sociology and the School of Cultural Studies at Tel Aviv University, focusing on the sociology of Palestinian children’s literature in Palestine. He has conducted extensive research in this field and built a unique database covering the past century. In addition to his academic pursuits, Loaay is a translator and an active member of the Maktoob translators’ circle, dedicated to translating various literary works from Arabic to Hebrew. In the academic year 2023/24, he is a EUME Fellow at the Forum Transregionale Studien.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search