Kategorie: Philological Conversations

The Philological Conversations series fosters critical reflections on philological scholarship from a comparative and global perspective. It features scholarly dialogues, book discussions, and essays on the politics and ethics of philological and historical research. While the dialogue form gives voice to the persona often overlooked in academic research, the book discussions and essays encourage reflection beyond the conventional academic review. We welcome original contributions committed to rethinking and renewing the craft of philology. The series is curated by the editorial board of Philological Encounters. Contact: Islam Dayeh.

Words and their Worlds: A Conversation with Dilip M. Menon

In this Philological Conversation, Dilip M. Menon dwells on the questions of how to think concepts and theorize from the Global South and on writing history beyond the Eurocentric, colonial, nationalist, and terrestrial. We discuss the political and epistemic implications and consequences of such urgent tasks. Dilip M. Menon speaks about his affinities with Edward Said, Mikhail Bakhtin, and Walter Benjamin, among others, and refects on the themes of coloniality of knowledge, postcoloniality, decoloniality, oceanic history, and the idea of paracoloniality. A conversation with Mahmoud Al-Zayed.

The Late Persianate World: Transregional Connections and the Question of Language

By Maryam Fatima, Alexander Jabbari and Mehtap Ozdemir. Contributing to the growing body of scholarship on the afterlives of the Persianate beyond the nineteenth century, this Philological Encounters’ special issue addresses questions of literary modernity in the Persianate world and takes the question of form to the fore, advancing a comparative methodology attuned to formalism and historicism.

An Unruly Persianate

By Purnima Dhavan. The Persianate world has long been defined as a distinct historical formation in the premodern era with a beginning and an end. More recently, scholars have rightly started to question this premature assumption of its demise. The special issue of Philological Encounters extends and complicates the argument about the long life of the Persianate. One hesitates to call it an afterlife, as it seems the “death” of the Persianate never happened.

Philology and Microhistory: A Conversation with Carlo Ginzburg

Islam Dayeh in conversation with Carlo Ginzburg. In this Philological Conversation, Carlo Ginzburg reflects on the place of philology in his work and explores the connections between philology, microhistory, and casuistry. We talk about the people who inspired his early thinking, including his father Leone Ginzburg, his mother Natalia, and his grandfather, moving on to Erich Auerbach, Leo Spitzer, and Sebastiano Timpanaro.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search