Kategorie: Academic Freedom

This series fosters scholarly and intellectual exchange on questions of academic freedom and freedom of thought in Europe and across the world. It publishes research papers, reports, talks, and thought pieces on academic freedom. The series has been initiated and is curated by former Fellows of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. It underlines the commitment of this Institute for Advanced Study to free research, thought, and artistic creation that has been part of its mission ever since its foundation. The program re:constitution – Exchange and Analysis on the Rule of Law in Europe at the Forum Transregionale Studien is also a contributing partner in the series, based on the re:constitution Seminar “Resisting Multiple Pressures – Perspectives on Academic Freedom in Europe” (Ljubljana, 11-12 November 2021). The series welcomes contributions (of up to 7,000 characters); all contributions will be submitted to the editorial team for approval and revision.

Contact: Daniel Schönpflug at daniel.schoenpflug@wiko-berlin.de.

Contextualizing and Conceptualizing Debates about Academic Freedom in Europe

By Anna L. Ahlers. After participating in the re:constitution seminar in Ljubljana, Slovenia in November 2021 and, also crucially, while working with colleagues in China, I cannot help but feel extremely lucky and privileged to be able to work under the academic circumstances that I do. They appear to be  so much easier to deal with than the ones I learned about in my interactions with academics from China, Hungary, Slovenia, Turkey, and other countries.

“Resisting Multiple Pressures – Perspectives on Academic Freedom in Europe” – Side Note on the re:constitution Seminar

By László Detre. re:constitution is a joint program of the Forum Transregionale Studien and Democracy Reporting International, funded by the Stiftung Mercator. Re:constitution awards fellowships, inspires and organizes topical seminars, and offers fact-based analysis on and around the rule of law and democracy in the European Union.

On the Margins of the University: Academics in the Face of Power in post-2016 Turkey

By Alihan Mestci. Culture is a battle that “has not yet been won” – this has been iterated on numerous occasions by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan ever since late 2016, the year of the July 15th coup attempt. The state of emergency has given a legal blank check for thousands of dismissals in the civil service as well as for the criminalization and marginalization of dissenting voices from the media and civil society.

Threats to Academic Freedom — A Comment

By David Armitage. Threats to academic freedom are now proliferating and accelerating in almost every part of the world. What could once be detected and resisted within specific local or national settings now increasingly appears to be part of a global movement to constrain, abridge, or abolish one of humanity’s oldest and most enduring positive freedoms.

Alternative Knowledge Production and Transmission in Turkey: Solidarity Academies (III)

By Noémi Lévy-Aksu. Since the mid-2010s, the authoritarian turn of the Turkish regime has resulted in multiple violations of human rights and freedoms. Universities have been particularly affected by the process, with mass dismissals of academics, repeated attacks on academic freedom and autonomy, and repression of students’ initiatives and protests.

Alternative Knowledge Production and Transmission in Turkey: Solidarity Academies (II)

By Noémi Lévy-Aksu. Since the mid-2010s, the authoritarian turn of the Turkish regime has resulted in multiple violations of human rights and freedoms. Universities have been particularly affected by the process, with mass dismissals of academics, repeated attacks on academic freedom and autonomy, and repression of students’ initiatives and protests.

Alternative Knowledge Production and Transmission in Turkey: Solidarity Academies (I)

By Noémi Lévy-Aksu. Since the mid-2010s, the authoritarian turn of the Turkish regime has resulted in multiple violations of human rights and freedoms. Universities have been particularly affected by the process, with mass dismissals of academics, repeated attacks on academic freedom and autonomy, and repression of students’ initiatives and protests.

The Long-lived “July Republic” and the Abolition of the Egyptian University’s Autonomy

By Amr Hamzawy. On September 28, 2020, a half-century had passed since the death of President Gamal Abdel Nasser. The legacy of the “July 1952 Republic”, whose legal and political pillars he built between 1952 and 1954 and that he ruled until his death in 1970, is still omnipresent in today’s Egypt.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search