Author: editorial board

Jesuit Legacy in Beijing: Sacred Buildings and Transcultural Spaces

By Lianming Wang. Following the “global turn” in the 1990s, and particularly stimulated by Gauvin Alexander Bailey’s path-breaking Art on the Jesuit Missions in Asia and Latin America, 1542–1773, the study of Jesuit art and architecture has grown into a remarkably dynamic field that provides marvellous insights for reading art history through a cross-cultural and transregional lens.

Imagining Southern Spaces: Hemispheric and Transatlantic Souths in Antebellum US Writings

By Deniz Bozkurt-Pekár. Let me set the scene: A rich meadow expanding by the bountiful river, a gentleman leaning on the white column of the porch of a haint-blue mansion, a pale-white lady in flamboyant attire sitting on a rocking-chair behind him, away from them yet within their eyesight are the cotton, corn, or tobacco fields hiding behind their crop the tired bodies of black men, women, and children.

The National Frame: Art and State Violence in Turkey and Germany

By Banu Karaca. The National Frame emerged out of my long-term interest in art, aesthetics and politics. I have always been fascinated by the dominant notion that art is inherently good, by the many values that are accorded to art – be it that art furthers individual agency and critical faculties, the emancipatory potential of art, or its civilizing impact – and the realities that shape the daily workings of the art world.

The Long-lived “July Republic” and the Abolition of the Egyptian University’s Autonomy

By Amr Hamzawy. On September 28, 2020, a half-century had passed since the death of President Gamal Abdel Nasser. The legacy of the “July 1952 Republic”, whose legal and political pillars he built between 1952 and 1954 and that he ruled until his death in 1970, is still omnipresent in today’s Egypt.

L’historiographie africaine et les défis de la périodisation européenne : un commentaire historique

Un texte de Ihediwa Nkemjika Chimee. L’historiographie africaine suit des divisions, schémas et séquences imposés par les européens. Ceux-ci ont affirmé dans le passé que l’histoire africaine n’existait pas et que l’histoire de l’Afrique débute avec l’histoire des européens en Afrique.

Refugees in African History

“Historicizing the refugee experience is crucial to understanding that refugees are not exceptions but integral to the rise of nation-states.” An interview with Marcia Schenck, Professor of Global History at the University of Potsdam, on her newly founded H-Net cross-network project “Refugees in African History”.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search